TV Review: ‘The Walking Dead’ S5E9 — “What Happened and What’s Going On”

by Regina Lizik, originally posted at Nerd Bastards, 9 February 2015

What happened and what’s going on is that this is the most beautiful hour of television you are likely to ever see. It’s about the hesitation of living and the hesitation of letting go. In one harrowing hour, we watch Tyreese struggle with whether or not to lay down his burden. By now, you all know the choice he makes, and if you don’t, I suggest you avoid this article and the entire internet until you watch the mid-season premiere. 

The first few minutes are a disjointed montage of scenes and lens flare effects. We see someone digging a grave, we see the sky, Maggie and Noah crying, Judith crying, the group at a funeral, people running, pictures of Noah’s brothers before the outbreak, the prison guard tower. We also see images of a car accident and a zombie trapped in one of the vehicles, as well as small painting of a cottage. The final two shots of the opening are the most disturbing: Meeka, smiling, turns to the camera and says “It’s better now,” while a smiling Lizzie sits behind her. The last shot is the small painting with blood pouring onto it. Continue reading “TV Review: ‘The Walking Dead’ S5E9 — “What Happened and What’s Going On””

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What Really Makes Katniss Stand Out? Peeta, Her Movie Girlfriend

by Linda Holmes, originally published by NPR, 25 November 2013

This weekend, Catching Fire, the second chapter of the Hunger Games film adaptations, raked in enormous piles of dough — with over $160 million in one weekend, it’s the biggest November opening ever. Ever. (Take that, Twilightsequels.) Much has been said, and rightly so, about Katniss Everdeen and the way she challenges a lot of traditional narratives about girls. She carries a bow, she fights, she kills, she survives, she’s emotionally unavailable, she’d rather act than talk, and … did we mention she kills?

But one of the most unusual things about Katniss isn’t the way she defies typical gender roles for heroines, but the way Peeta, her arena partner and one of her two love interests, defies typical Hollywood versions of gender roles for boyfriends. Continue reading “What Really Makes Katniss Stand Out? Peeta, Her Movie Girlfriend”

What We Hunger For

by Roxane Gay, originally published at The Rumpus, 12 April, 2012

I am always interested in the representations of strength in women, where that strength comes from, how it is called upon when it is needed most, and what it costs for a woman to be strong.

All too often, representations of a woman’s strength overlook that cost.

The Hunger Games, released in 2008, is the first book in a trilogy by Suzanne Collins. Catching Fire and Mockingjay, the next two books, were released in 2009 and 2010. The franchise was an instant success. More than 2.9 million copies of the books are in print. There are more than twenty foreign editions. The Hunger Games was on the New York Times bestseller list for 100 weeks. There are special editions. There is merchandise including a Katniss Barbie, which Katniss would absolutely hate. In March 2012, the movie was released and thus far has earned nearly $460 million worldwide. I am part of the problem. I have seen the movie four times and have plans to see it again. Continue reading “What We Hunger For”

Harry Potter: Pampered jock, patsy, fraud.

By Chris Suellentrop, originally published by Slate, 6 October 2006

Warning: This article contains a few spoilers about the Harry Potter books and movies. Like most heroes, Harry Potter possesses the requisite Boy Scout virtues: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent. But so do lots of boys and girls, and they don’t get books and movies named after them. Why isn’t the movie that comes out next week titled Ron Weasley and the Chamber of Secrets? Why isn’t its sequel dubbed Hermione Granger and the Prisoner of Azkaban? Why Harry? What makes him so special?

Simple: He’s a glory hog who unfairly receives credit for the accomplishments of others and who skates through school by taking advantage of his inherited wealth and his establishment connections. Harry Potter is no braver than his best friend, Ron Weasley, just richer and better-connected. Harry’s other good friend, Hermione Granger, is smarter and a better student. The one thing Harry excels at is the sport of Quidditch, and his pampered-jock status allows him to slide in his studies, as long as he brings the school glory on the playing field. But as Charles Barkley long ago noted, being a good athlete doesn’t make you a role model.

Continue reading “Harry Potter: Pampered jock, patsy, fraud.”

On Charlotte Lucas’s Choice

Like many long-time readers of “Pride and Prejudice,” I’ve returned, again and again, to the problem of Charlotte Lucas. Pretty much everyone in “Pride and Prejudice” gets the spouse they deserve, except for Charlotte. Elizabeth’s best friend is a sensible, intelligent person, but because she isn’t young, pretty, or rich, she ends up married to the maddening and empty-headed Mr. Collins. (Lizzy calls him, in a letter to her sister, a “conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man.”) “Pride and Prejudice” is a joyous novel, but Charlotte’s marriage is like the tomb in that Poussin painting “Et in Arcadia ego.” Even at Pemberley, I am here, it seems to say.

I first read “Pride and Prejudice” in high school, and back then I didn’t devote a lot of thought to Charlotte’s marriage. As time has gone on, though, it’s seemed more and more important to me. Growing older involves making compromises, and I suppose that has something to do with it. But I’ve also become more familiar with the importance, in life, of choice. In a lot of ways, that’s what “Pride and Prejudice” is about: how we make choices. And no story in the novel says more about choices, about their difficulty and meaning, than Charlotte’s. Continue reading “On Charlotte Lucas’s Choice”

‘Go Set A Watchman’ Is A Revelation On Race, Not A Disappointment

By Errin Whack, published by NPR, 16 July 2015

I don’t remember how old I was when I read To Kill A Mockingbird for the first time. But I do know that I loved it — which is why I was thrilled in February at the news that another manuscript penned by Harper Lee, previously unknown to the larger public, existed and would be published this summer.

For lovers of the original story, the next few months could not pass quickly enough. But that anticipation turned to anxiety last week as reports trickled out that Go Set a Watchman reunites them with an Atticus Finch who is not the idealistic Southern gentleman of their youth, but rather a segregationist once involved with the Ku Klux Klan.

For many, this revelation has been nothing short of a betrayal (as seen in these recent tweets):

Continue reading “‘Go Set A Watchman’ Is A Revelation On Race, Not A Disappointment”

AP Lit Question 3 (open): a NINE

In our world today, the fear of people who do not look, act, or talk like us is crippling. We, as a whole, do not easily accept or assimilate those who have been otherized into our communities. Throughout various works of literature, though, it is evident that characters whose origins are unusual or mysterious are able to fully participate in the societies in which they appear. Toni Morrison’s Beloved presents one such situation. When the spirit of Sethe’s late baby materializes at her doorstep, the lives of Sethe, Denver, Paul D, and Beloved are changed forever. Because of Beloved’s unusual origins, she has trouble formulating a meaningful self-identity, the family is polarized because of her unexpected arrival, and the novel as a whole is able to better communicate the message that humans have a distinct and deep ability to adapt to new environments. Continue reading “AP Lit Question 3 (open): a NINE”